Sculpture Unveiled at Anguilla’s Clayton J. Lloyd International Airport

On 2 November, End Polio Now, an impressive work in Native Anguilla Stone by renowned British artist Alexandra Harley MRBS, was publicly unveiled at Anguilla’s Clayton J. Lloyd International Airport through the kind generosity and efforts of the Rotary Club of Anguilla.

Honoured guests included Ian Riseley, President-Elect of Rotary International—the first time a President or President Elect of the worldwide Rotary International organization has visited Anguilla—and Robert Leger, District Governor Elect of Rotary District 7020 (Rotary Club of Les Cayes) and their respective wives, Julie Riseley and Rosa Leger. Prestigious representatives of the Anguillian governmentMr. Perin Bradley, Hon. Deputy Governor; Mr. Evans McNeil Rogers, Hon. Minister of Social Development; and Mr. Carlton Pickering, Vice-President of the Anguilla Chamber of Commerce and Industryalso joined us for this monumental occasion.

Harley carved End Polio Now last November at the First Anguilla Sculpture Symposium, the first event of its kind in the Caribbean. When the Rotary Club of Anguilla suggested the "end polio" theme to Ms. Harley, she embraced it with her characteristic passion. She studied the disease, including photomicrographs of the virus and the vaccine, and conceived a symbology that follows the DNA visual of the polio vaccination.

This work draws attention to the on-going fight against polio in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. For decades Rotary International has led the struggle to eradicate this disease. Only our vigilance, and continued vaccination of potential victims, will keep it from spreading. To learn more, and how you can help, please visit, http://www.endpolio.org/.

Precious Moments

 Alex with Tjrenique [ph: Tay-jen-eek], daughter of our COO, Hendrick Richardson  Photo by J.Lindblad

Alex with Tjrenique [ph: Tay-jen-eek], daughter of our COO, Hendrick Richardson

Photo by J.Lindblad

 May I have your autograph, please?  Photo by K.Sharp

May I have your autograph, please?

Photo by K.Sharp

 I wonder who is sitting on the opposite side of the Arawak Loveseat, don't you? [There was nobody, she's just shy.]  photo by k.Sharp

I wonder who is sitting on the opposite side of the Arawak Loveseat, don't you? [There was nobody, she's just shy.]

photo by k.Sharp

 What is the best stone to get autographed?  photo by K.Sharp

What is the best stone to get autographed?

photo by K.Sharp

 What do you do before a camera? Anything you can!  photo by K.Sharp

What do you do before a camera? Anything you can!

photo by K.Sharp

 After a L-O-N-G- day. From left to right, Prince Pogson-volunteer, Almuth, Dan Smith-volunteer, and Alex.  photo by W.Bayer

After a L-O-N-G- day. From left to right, Prince Pogson-volunteer, Almuth, Dan Smith-volunteer, and Alex.

photo by W.Bayer

School trips

Is art a vanity pursuit of bored individuals with no ambition to do something more useful for the general welfare of the community, for their neighbors? Or is artistic expression a fundamental human quality that is shared by all people, save a few jaded and unhappy souls who should be pitied? Are not the youngest of children attracted to beautiful things?  Do you not feel a sense of gratification upon beholding things of beauty, natural or man-made? Do you believe in the transformative power of art? We at the FASS do believe.

 

Is quarrying stone for sculpture, or native stone tiles for that matter, raping the Earth, and ecologically unsound? Incredible as it may seem, some who should clearly know better have suggested so. Yet marble, granite, limestone, all kinds of stone, have been quarried by human civilizations for eons and used to beautify their world with expressions of their creativity that we continue to admire today.

 

This Sculpture Symposium was undertaken at great effort and expense to inspire and encourage young and old, especially those with latent talent, and awaken in them the consciousness of what they might do, and the desire to do it, to create, using the tools and resources around them.  Artists and galleries across the island, and even in neighboring St. Martin, were excited by the coming of this event, the first art event in too many years in Anguilla, and specifically the first art event of its kind anywhere in the Caribbean.

 

Art teachers from all the islands’ schools were invited to bring their classes to the worksite in order that the students can see the work the sculptors were doing, and to ask them about their work, their careers their art. The turn out was very satisfying to us. Our only regret is that the workshop we had planned had to be cancelled because the tools that had been ordered well in advance were back-ordered by the supplier and did not arrive on island in time.

 

Visit our Facebook page. We have just posted photos taken by our photographer, KSharp and some by the Director too. All three sculptors were very pleased by the interest shown by students and teachers alike in the work they were doing. 

The Finished Sculptures

After three weeks of hard, dirty work, the masterpieces emerge.

 'Arawak Loveseat', Anguilla,   photo by the artist

'Arawak Loveseat', Anguilla, 

photo by the artist

 'End Polio Now' by Alexandra Harley, MRBS, Anguilla, 2015  photo by J.B.Hudson

'End Polio Now' by Alexandra Harley, MRBS, Anguilla, 2015

photo by J.B.Hudson

 'Smiles' by Almuth Tebbenhoff, FRBS, Anguilla, 2015  photo by W.J.Bayer

'Smiles' by Almuth Tebbenhoff, FRBS, Anguilla, 2015

photo by W.J.Bayer

 'End Polio Now' from another of its many angles  photo by W.J.Bayer

'End Polio Now' from another of its many angles

photo by W.J.Bayer

 Another angle!  photo by W.J.Bayer

Another angle!

photo by W.J.Bayer

 A different angle   photo by J.B.Hudson

A different angle 

photo by J.B.Hudson

 Another side of 'End Polio Now'  photo by J.B.Hudson

Another side of 'End Polio Now'

photo by J.B.Hudson

 The play of shadows on 'Smiles' grabs your attention  photo by J.B.Hudson

The play of shadows on 'Smiles' grabs your attention

photo by J.B.Hudson

 See the smiles? Or are they ... wings? ... sails?

See the smiles? Or are they ... wings? ... sails?

 Inspired by an Arawak carving on a  stalagmite in Anguilla's Fountain Cavern, this image of Jocahu by Jon Barlow Hudson gazes down upon visitors.  photo by W.J.Bayer

Inspired by an Arawak carving on a  stalagmite in Anguilla's Fountain Cavern, this image of Jocahu by Jon Barlow Hudson gazes down upon visitors.

photo by W.J.Bayer

 Another petroglyph Jon saw in the Fountain Cavern, a lizard. And look at the back of the loveseat. Are those reptilian scales?

Another petroglyph Jon saw in the Fountain Cavern, a lizard. And look at the back of the loveseat. Are those reptilian scales?

 The other loveseat, under the eyes. These eyes are often portrayed in the Arawak petroglyphs.   photo by J.B.Hudson

The other loveseat, under the eyes. These eyes are often portrayed in the Arawak petroglyphs. 

photo by J.B.Hudson